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StandingRockProtest
By: Indigenousns
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March 31, 2017

Stop the Dakota Access Pipeline

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Thanks for joining Us. Support this Petition NOW

International Petition PROTECT OUR SACRED LANDS & WATERS

This petition is now closed.

End date: Dec 31, 2018

Signatures collected: 38

Signature goal: 1000000

38 signatures

Latest Signatures
38tylor ottoJul 04, 2017
37David BenguiguiApr 06, 2017
36NICOLAS AnneApr 05, 2017
35Michaela SchaadApr 05, 2017
34Jacqueline Rose SteinerApr 04, 2017
33Elio HaringApr 04, 2017
32Gabriele SchellhaasApr 04, 2017
31Francine PERRENOUDApr 04, 2017
30Claudine LiechtiApr 04, 2017
29muriel falgayrettesApr 03, 2017
28Christiane NetzerApr 03, 2017
27Muriel MillotApr 02, 2017
26Ilham Hanae Trojahn Apr 02, 2017
25Edith CarmanApr 02, 2017
24Mary SuretteApr 02, 2017
23Brianne OxendineApr 02, 2017
22Janey BoschApr 02, 2017
21Saffore MyriamApr 02, 2017
20Grace MantichApr 02, 2017
19Joan WorthingtonApr 02, 2017
18Teresa BarnesApr 02, 2017
17Heather Ryan Apr 02, 2017
16Vickie wertz Apr 02, 2017
15Ted Wagner JrApr 02, 2017
14Janet GunnApr 02, 2017
13Ewa SękApr 01, 2017
12Porté agnèsApr 01, 2017
11Sunny PetersenApr 01, 2017
10Tamlin SchiblerTamlin ulmannApr 01, 2017
9Huguette VermetteApr 01, 2017
8Karin NiedermayrApr 01, 2017
7Zuzana ChoainApr 01, 2017
6silvia zuccattiApr 01, 2017
5Hatez FannyApr 01, 2017
4Delphine CoriérasApr 01, 2017
3Andree JodryApr 01, 2017
2LEFEVRE MathieuMar 31, 2017
1White Eagle ManituMar 31, 2017
Dakota Access pipeline: the who, what and why of the Standing Rock protests
Everything you need to know about the controversial oil pipeline that has become a rallying cry for indigenous rights and climate change activismNopiStoppipe5
The Native American protests against the Dakota Access pipeline have become an international rallying cry for indigenous rights and climate change activism, drawing thousands to the rural area of Cannon Ball, North Dakota.

As the controversial oil pipeline approaches the river that the Standing Rock Sioux tribe fears it will contaminate – and as a militarized police force continues to engage in tense standoffs with demonstrators – here is what we know so far.

What is the Dakota Access pipeline?The Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) is a $3.7bn project that would transport crude oil from the Bakken oil field in North Dakota to a refinery to Patoka, Illinois, near Chicago.

The 1,172-mile pipeline, roughly 30 inches in diameter, would carry 470,000 barrels per day and is a project of company Energy Transfer Partners.

Who is opposing the project and why?
The local Standing Rock Sioux tribe and thousands of Native American supporters from across North America have set up camps in Cannon Ball to try and block the oil project. Opponents of DAPL say the project threatens sacred native lands and could contaminate their water supply from the Missouri river, which is the longest river in North Activists call themselves “water protectors” and argue that the pipeline poses similar threats to the now defeated Keystone XL, but lament that DAPL has failed to garner the same amount of national attention. Tribal leaders also say that the US army corps of engineers’ initial decision to allow the pipeline to run within a half-mile of the local reservation was done without consulting tribal governments and without a thorough study of impacts.

This means, the tribe says, that the project violates federal law and native treaties with the US government.
Where are the protests taking place?
The first protest camp emerged in April when members of the Standing Rock Lakota and other Native American nations rode on horseback and established a spiritual camp called Sacred Stone.

Several other large camps, featuring a diverse mix of tribes and non-native supporters, have since emerged nearby. The main camp where more than 1,000 are gathered is called Oceti Sakowin. The Standing Rock camps are all located about an hour south of Bismarck, North Dakota, though police have established strict roadblocks along 1806, the main local highway, meaning visitors have to head west and enter from the south to get to the demonstration.

Some of the camps are on lands controlled by the US army corps of engineers and other sites are on private land owned by Ladonna Allard, a member of the Dakota Sioux.

Youth leaders have often been on the frontlines of standoffs with police, at times facing Mace, rubber bullets and other threats from law enforcement. Elderly leaders have also led demonstrations.

How has the federal government responded?The US army corps of engineers, along with a number of federal agencies, announced in September that it was reviewing its approvals and temporarily halting permits for construction on federal land near or under the Missouri river.

In his first remarks since protests escalated, Barack Obama said the army corps was studying whether the pipeline could be rerouted around sacred native lands. His comments, published on 1 November, did not include specific proposals or commitments and said the government was “going to let it play out for several more weeks and determine whether or not this can be resolved in a way that I think is properly attentive to the traditions of the first Americans”.

How have police responded to demonstrations?
The Morton County sheriff’s office, along with Cass County law enforcement and supporting police agencies from across the state, have formed a highly militarized police force that has aggressively targeted protesters attempting to block construction.

As of November, police have made more than 400 arrests, many of which occurred during two separate protest clashes within one week.

Police, who are often armed with large tanks and riot gear, have used pepper spray, teargas, rubber bullets, Tasers and other “less-than-lethal” tools to respond. Jack Dalrymple, North Dakota’s governor, also called in the national guard. Law enforcement leaders have charged Native Americans, journalists and film-makers, with rioting, criminal trespass, resisting arrest and a range of more serious felonies. Police have also been accused of human rights violations in their treatment of jailed protesters, and a United Nations group opened an investigation into local law enforcement.

Police officials claim that they have been forced to arrest protesters when they enter the property where construction is planned. Local officials have also slammed Obama, saying he has not done enough to help law enforcement and stop protesters.

What is the status of the tribe’s court fight against the project?
The Standing Rock tribe is also fighting the project in court, arguing that the approvals of the project were improper and that the government has failed to do a study that would assess the large-scale impact of the pipeline.

But in September, federal judge James Boasberg ruled that the US army corps of engineers “likely complied” with the National Historic Preservation Act.

The tribe has also argued that the pipeline violates the United Nations’ declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples.

What has Energy Transfer Partners said about the protests?
Energy Transfer Partners said in court filings in September that the Dakota Access pipeline is 45% complete and that a temporary injunction to stop it would have “devastating short and long-term impacts”. The company has also previously denounced “threats and attacks” perpetrated upon its employees.

In response to concerns of contamination and environmental hazards, DAPL has argued that pipelines are the safest, most efficient method of transporting oil. The company also claims that increased production in the Bakken oil field has led to a rise in the shipment of oil by rail and truck, leaving less transportation available for regional agriculture.What have Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump said about DAPL?
After a group of Standing Rock youth staged a protest at the Brooklyn campaign headquarters of Hillary Clinton in late October, the Democratic presidential nominee released a short statement that did not take a stance on the pipeline or the protests.She said she believed “all voices should be heard”, adding: “It’s important that on the ground in North Dakota, everyone respects demonstrators’ rights to protest peacefully, and workers’ rights to do their jobs safely.”

Republican nominee Donald Trump has not publicly commented on the protests, but it was revealed in October that he has close financial ties to Energy Transfer Partners.

Who else is supporting the protesters?
The anti-pipeline movement has attracted support on the ground from actor Shailene Woodley, who was arrested while protesting, and Mark Ruffalo, who visited in October. Civil rights leader Jesse Jackson also made an appearance at the site.

US senator Bernie Sanders, who lost to Clinton in the Democratic primary, has also issued numerous statements in support of the protest.

Green party candidate Jill Stein faced charges for graffiti at the pipeline protest.
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International Petition PROTECT OUR SACRED LANDS & WATERS

This petition is now closed.

End date: Dec 31, 2018

Signatures collected: 38

Signature goal: 1000000

38 signatures

Latest Signatures
38tylor ottoJul 04, 2017
37David BenguiguiApr 06, 2017
36NICOLAS AnneApr 05, 2017
35Michaela SchaadApr 05, 2017
34Jacqueline Rose SteinerApr 04, 2017
33Elio HaringApr 04, 2017
32Gabriele SchellhaasApr 04, 2017
31Francine PERRENOUDApr 04, 2017
30Claudine LiechtiApr 04, 2017
29muriel falgayrettesApr 03, 2017
28Christiane NetzerApr 03, 2017
27Muriel MillotApr 02, 2017
26Ilham Hanae Trojahn Apr 02, 2017
25Edith CarmanApr 02, 2017
24Mary SuretteApr 02, 2017
23Brianne OxendineApr 02, 2017
22Janey BoschApr 02, 2017
21Saffore MyriamApr 02, 2017
20Grace MantichApr 02, 2017
19Joan WorthingtonApr 02, 2017
18Teresa BarnesApr 02, 2017
17Heather Ryan Apr 02, 2017
16Vickie wertz Apr 02, 2017
15Ted Wagner JrApr 02, 2017
14Janet GunnApr 02, 2017
13Ewa SękApr 01, 2017
12Porté agnèsApr 01, 2017
11Sunny PetersenApr 01, 2017
10Tamlin SchiblerTamlin ulmannApr 01, 2017
9Huguette VermetteApr 01, 2017
8Karin NiedermayrApr 01, 2017
7Zuzana ChoainApr 01, 2017
6silvia zuccattiApr 01, 2017
5Hatez FannyApr 01, 2017
4Delphine CoriérasApr 01, 2017
3Andree JodryApr 01, 2017
2LEFEVRE MathieuMar 31, 2017
1White Eagle ManituMar 31, 2017
STANDING ROCK TO THE WORLD: 10 INDIGENOUS AND ENVIRONMENTAL STRUGGLES YOU CAN SUPPORT IN 2017
10 INDIGENOUS AND ENVIRONMENTAL STRUGGLES YOU CAN SUPPORT IN 2017

THE PLACES THAT NEED HELP MOST, AND ALL WAYS TO SUPPORT THEM.

The Black Snake is not yet dead. Far from it. The corporations behind the Dakota Access pipeline made it clear that they “fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe.”

The winter camps will stand their ground as long as DAPL construction equipment remains on Oceti Sakowin treaty land. We can all continue to support them by emailing or calling the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at 202-761-8700 to ask when it will open the Environmental Impact Statement process to public comment. We can also keep pressure on the banks to divest with our international campaign to #DefundDAPL.

But while international attention has been on the Standing Rock Sioux and the #NoDAPL struggle, the Obama and Trudeau administrations have approved several other pipeline projects slated to run across indigenous territories from Canada to the U.S. and Mexico. The struggle to protect sacred lands from climate change, toxic pollution, and the fossil fuel industry continues to rage around the world.

In the year ahead, it is our hope that the energy and love we have received in our struggle against the Dakota Access pipeline can also be extended to other indigenous communities in their local battles. Here are ten struggles you could consider donating to, volunteering time for, or supporting in other ways:

1. Trans-Pecos pipeline and Comanche Trail pipeline – Texas – Chihuahua, Mexico

In May 2016, the Obama administration approved two pipeline projects by Energy Transfer Partners, the same company behind DAPL. The Trans-Pecos and Comanche Trail pipelines would carry fracked gas from Texas into Mexico, where it will supply the Mexican energy grid. The Two Rivers camp is a resistance camp being erected in the face of the Trans-Pecos pipeline. Support their legal defense fund and camp fundraiser. Or support the efforts of No Trans Pecos Pipeline, the Big Bend Conservation Alliance, and the Frontera Water Protection Alliance as they organize against these pipelines.

2. Copper One Rivière Doré Mine – Quebec, Canada

The Algonquins of Barriere Lake have set-up a land protection camp at a proposed mining site in the heart of their territory, where core sample drilling for the Rivière Doré copper mine is scheduled to begin at any time. They have been camped for weeks to protect the headwaters of the Ottawa River, which could have catastrophic downstream effects if mined. The staked area is abundant with lakes, wetlands, and waterways and is also a crucial hunting and fishing area for Barriere Lake families. See their urgent call to action here and donate to the campaign or get involved here.

3. Sabal Trail pipeline – Alabama – Georgia – Florida

The Sabal Trail pipeline, a 515-mile natural gas pipeline project, is being constructed from Alabama to Georgia to Florida. It threatens one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world. The Sacred Water Camp and Water Is Life Camp are ongoing camps in need of supplies, experienced organizers, and other people. An upcoming mass civil disobedience event is inviting all to mobilize in Florida. Get in touch here or donate to support the camps. Also support the organizing efforts of the SPIRET Foundation and Bobby C. Billie, one of the clan leaders and spiritual leader of the Council of the Original Miccosukee Simanolee Nation Aboriginal Peoples, in their efforts to hold regulatory agencies accountable for support of the pipeline. Contact organizers Shannon Larsen or email Beth Huss.

Keep up to date with events with all groups statewide at the Water Protector Alliance calendar.

4. Line 3 pipeline – Alberta, Canada to Superior, Wisconsin

Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently announced the government’s approval of the massive Line 3 pipeline project, designed to transport tar sands oil from the mines of Hardisty, Alberta, to Superior, Wisconsin, through the heart of Anishinaabe territory and some of the most beautiful lakes and wild rice beds in the world. The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs is challenging the Trudeau government’s approval of Line 3. Follow and support Honor the Earth’s work, learn about ongoing resistance to Line 3, and follow community members’ opposition to the pipeline here.

5. Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline – Alberta to British Columbia, Canada

The expansion of Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline, also approved by Canada’s federal government, would transport tar sands oil from northern Alberta to the British Columbia coast. The Sacred Trust is an initiative of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and a mandate to stop this project. You can donate here through RAVEN (Respecting Aboriginal Values and Environmental Needs) or Join their mailing list to follow this campaign and receive updates.

6. Pilgrim pipeline – New York and New Jersey

The Ramapough Lunaape Nation, a community in the Ramapo Mountains currently face the threat of the Pilgrim pipeline, which would transport Bakken crude oil from Albany, New York, to Linden, New Jersey. Meanwhile, Spectra Energy continues to expand its pipeline network so that more fracked natural gas can be transported and ultimately exported out of the country. Read about the history of the Ramapough Lunaape here, follow the developments at Split Rock Prayer Camp, and follow ongoing efforts to resist continued Spectra expansion with the FANG Collective and Resist Spectra.

7. Petronas/Pacific Northwest Terminal – Prince Rupert, British Columbia

The Petronas/Pacific Northwest Terminal is a proposed liquefied natural gas plant on traditional Lax Kw’alaams territory Lax U’u’la (Lelu Island) at the mouth of the Skeena river near Prince Rupert, British Columbia. Plans call for a 48-inch diameter submarine pipeline to be dredged into estuary sediment to supply fracked gas from Treaty 8 territory. Ten Indigenous nations and 60,000 people in the Skeena watershed rely on fish there for food, commercial fishing, and cultural identity. The Lelu Island Camp has been set up on Lax Kw’alaams traditional territory to stop this terminal from being built without consent.

8. Diamond pipeline – Oklahoma – Arkansas – Tennessee

Arkansas Rising is a collective of guardians working through direct action to stop the Diamond pipeline, a 20-inch diameter pipeline that would run 440 miles from Cushing, Oklahoma, to Memphis, Tennessee. The pipeline would cross more than 500 waterways, including five major watersheds. Construction has already begun. Donate to their efforts here.

9. Atlantic Sunrise pipeline and Sunoco Mariner East 2 pipeline – Pennsylvania

The Atlantic Sunrise pipeline is a proposed high-pressure 42-inch diameter pipeline to carry fracked gas from Marcellus Shale to U.S. markets to the south. Members of Lancaster Against Pipelines and supporters have built a blockade, nicknamed “The Stand,” on a farm in Conestoga in Lancaster County in the path of a proposed route. They are refusing to grant right of way to the project and have said they will occupy it if construction begins. Visit the Clean Air Council for more information, find the schedule for public input here, and keep an eye out for an upcoming mobilization at Pennsylvania Against Atlantic Sunrise. The Sunoco Mariner East pipeline is a proposed natural gas liquid pipeline that would cross four states. The construction permits for the pipeline could be granted any day. Stay updated at Juniata Watershed People Before Pipelines. Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics are parent corporations of the Dakota Access pipeline and will be merging in the first quarter of 2017.

10. Bayou Bridge pipeline – Louisiana

In 2017, Bold Louisiana is organizing to stop the proposed Bayou Bridge pipeline in Louisiana, a state that is experiencing climate devastation and coastline loss at an average rate of one football field of land every hour. This pipeline, a sister and end point to the Dakota Access pipeline, would run from Lake Charles to St. James, Louisiana. Support their efforts, follow their progress, or go to Baton Rouge to disrupt the Bayou Bridge public hearing on January 12.

#NoDAPL #TwoRiversCamp #NoTPPL #NoCTPL #BarriereLake #StopSabalTrail #StopLine3 #StopKM #StopETP #WaterIsLifeCamp #SacredWaterCamp #StopSpectra#StopPilgrimPipeline #SplitRockCamp #NoLNG #ArkansasRising #StopDiamondPipeline #NoASPL #LancasterAgainstPipelines #NoMarinerEast #NoBayouBridge

AND WE’LL SUGGEST THREE MORE: SUPPORT THE LONG-RUNNING RESISTANCE OF PROTECT MAUNA KEA ON THE BIG ISLAND OF HAWAII, THE UNIS’TOT’EN CAMP IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, AND SAVING OAK FLAT! AT THE SAN CARLOS APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA.

This article was written by the Indigenous #NoDAPL coalition who have been organizing at Standing Rock: Honor the Earth, Sacred Stone Camp, Indigenous Environmental Network, and the International Indigenous Youth Council.

International Petition PROTECT OUR SACRED LANDS & WATERS

This petition is now closed.

End date: Dec 31, 2018

Signatures collected: 38

Signature goal: 1000000

38 signatures

Latest Signatures
38tylor ottoJul 04, 2017
37David BenguiguiApr 06, 2017
36NICOLAS AnneApr 05, 2017
35Michaela SchaadApr 05, 2017
34Jacqueline Rose SteinerApr 04, 2017
33Elio HaringApr 04, 2017
32Gabriele SchellhaasApr 04, 2017
31Francine PERRENOUDApr 04, 2017
30Claudine LiechtiApr 04, 2017
29muriel falgayrettesApr 03, 2017
28Christiane NetzerApr 03, 2017
27Muriel MillotApr 02, 2017
26Ilham Hanae Trojahn Apr 02, 2017
25Edith CarmanApr 02, 2017
24Mary SuretteApr 02, 2017
23Brianne OxendineApr 02, 2017
22Janey BoschApr 02, 2017
21Saffore MyriamApr 02, 2017
20Grace MantichApr 02, 2017
19Joan WorthingtonApr 02, 2017
18Teresa BarnesApr 02, 2017
17Heather Ryan Apr 02, 2017
16Vickie wertz Apr 02, 2017
15Ted Wagner JrApr 02, 2017
14Janet GunnApr 02, 2017
13Ewa SękApr 01, 2017
12Porté agnèsApr 01, 2017
11Sunny PetersenApr 01, 2017
10Tamlin SchiblerTamlin ulmannApr 01, 2017
9Huguette VermetteApr 01, 2017
8Karin NiedermayrApr 01, 2017
7Zuzana ChoainApr 01, 2017
6silvia zuccattiApr 01, 2017
5Hatez FannyApr 01, 2017
4Delphine CoriérasApr 01, 2017
3Andree JodryApr 01, 2017
2LEFEVRE MathieuMar 31, 2017
1White Eagle ManituMar 31, 2017

NATIVE AMERICAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS FILE LAWSUIT TO OVERTURN PRESIDENT TRUMP’S KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE PERMIT
First Suit Filed for an Injunction Against Trump’s Keystone XL Pipeline Permit by Indigenous Environmental Network, North Coast Rivers Alliance
March 29, 2017
For Immediate Release
Contacts:
Nina Smith, nina@megaphonestrategies.com, 301-717-9006
Diane May, diane@megaphonestrategies.com, 317-292-2922
Stephan Volker, svolker@volkerlaw.com, 510-496-0600
Frank Egger, fjegger@gmail.com, 415-686-7153
The Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN) and North Coast Rivers Alliance (NCRA) have filed suit in Federal District Court in Great Falls, Montana, challenging the Presidential Permit issued by President Trump allowing construction and operation of the Keystone XL Pipeline.
Click here to read: IEN’s and NCRA’s Complaint challenging the State Department’s approval of a Presidential Permit for the KXL Pipeline
Click here for a PDF copy of the original press release.
Stephan Volker, attorney for IEN and NCRA, filed the suit on Monday, March 27th. The suit alleges that the State Department’s Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (“FSEIS”) fails to (1) provide a detailed and independent Project purpose and need, (2) analyze all reasonable alternatives to the Project, (3) study the Project’s transboundary effects, (4) disclose and fully analyze many of the Project’s adverse environmental impacts, (5) formulate adequate mitigation measures, and (6) respond adequately to comments. In addition, the FSEIS was irredeemably tainted because it was prepared by Environmental Resource Management (“ERM”), a company with a substantial conflict of interest. The suit also alleges that Trump’s permit violates the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.
“President Trump is breaking established environmental laws and treaties in his efforts to force through the Keystone XL Pipeline, that would bring carbon-intensive, toxic, and corrosive crude oil from the Canadian tar sands, but we are filing suit to fight back,” said Tom Goldtooth, Executive Director of the Indigenous Environmental Network. “Indigenous peoples’ lands and waters are not here to be America’s environmental sacrifice zone. For too long, the U.S. Government has pushed around Indigenous peoples and undervalued our inherent rights, sovereignty, culture, and our responsibilities as guardians of Mother Earth and all life, while fueling catastrophic extreme weather and climate change with an addiction to fossil fuels. The time has come to keep fossil fuels in the ground and shut down risky extreme energy projects like the tar sands that are poisoning our families, wildlife, water sources and destroying our climate.”
“Oil, water, and fish do not mix. KXL poses an unacceptable risk to the Missouri River and its fisheries, including the nearly extinct Arctic grayling,” said Frank Egger, President of The North Coast Rivers Alliance (NCRA). “No oil pipeline is safe. One major oil spill, and the Missouri River and adjacent aquifers would be polluted for generations.”
“Because President Trump has turned his back on the Native American community and protection of our clean water, endangered fisheries, and indeed, survival of the Planet itself, we have asked the Federal Courts to order him to comply with our nation’s environmental laws,” said Volker. “We are confident that the courts will apply and enforce the law fairly and faithfully, and protect our irreplaceable natural heritage from the risky and unneeded KXL Pipeline. Alternatives including renewable energy and conservation must be given full and fair consideration to protect future generations from the ravages of global warming.”
Click here for a PDF copy of the original press release.
Additional documents pertaining to the litigation can be obtained from the Volker Law Offices.

#NoDAPL Last Stand Call to Action!
Dept. of Army Approves DAPL Easement
Tuesday February 7, the US Army Corps gave notice of intent to grant the final easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline to cross the Mni Sose (Missouri River). They are skipping the EIS ordered in December, and skipping the congressional notification period required by law. This is a response to President Trump’s Presidential Memorandum directing the Corps to expedite approval of the project.
The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe will likely sue and ask for a temporary restraining order to halt construction while the legality of this decision is reviewed in court. In the meantime, DAPL will likely start drilling immediately. The media recently reported that DAPL says their best case scenario timeline is 83 days from easement to oil flow.
DAPL-Easement-Granted-300x251Call to Action!
The Indigenous Coalition at Standing Rock is calling for an international day of emergency actions to disrupt business as usual and unleash a global intersectional resistance to fossil fuels and fascism. Connect with other struggles. Think long-term movement building. We are in this for the long haul.
We are calling for emergency actions all over the world. Please visit everydayofaction.org to find or register an action wherever you are. Check out our world action map to join the mass distributed actions TODAY, February 8th and for the next four days.
The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has consistently asked for people to go home, and we understand this. Regardless, water protectors remain on the ground at the Sacred Stone Camp, determined to stop the black snake, and we support them. If you go, expect police violence, mass arrests, felony charges for just about anything, abuse while in custody, targeted persecution and racial profiling while driving around the area, etc.
We encourage groups across the globe to connect our prayers for the water with other fights against fascism and the domination of people and Mother Earth (deportations, Muslim ban, attacks on labor, deregulation of Wall Street, other fossil fuel projects, censorship of the press and academia, etc)
Choose the target that is most strategic for building long-term collaborative resistance in your local area. Potential targets may include: fossil fuel transportation hubs, city halls, federal buildings, Army Corps offices, banks profiting off DAPL, sheriff’s offices that have come to Standing Rock, labor union offices, and other sites intersectional struggle like ICE detention centers, etc.
MESSAGING:
#RisewithStandingRock….against violations of sovereignty, crimes against Mother Earth, fascism, violation of law, etc.
Unify the People
DAPL is Violating Human Rights
Normalize resistance / We Will Not Be Governed by Tyrants
Support Tribes’ request for TRO (Temporary Restraining Order)/injunction!
Continue to elevate what’s happening on the ground in ND — demonstrate that this is something serious that resonates to all peoples in the face of Trump administration tyranny.
Resist Trump’s direct attack against indigenous communities with his executive orders re: DAPL & KXL
Police violence seems inevitable and mass casualties are very likely. The only way to keep people safe is to do the EIS. If not, any blood spilled is on Trump’s hands and the hands of the Corps.

We #Resist to #Thrive.More Info about this Movement


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